Bending the Truth in the Mobile Debate: iPhone 6’s Alleged Flaw

Technology and how the technology is used are things that are sometimes at odds with the other. Like something built for one purpose, but utilized for another, or something that can be used to varying degrees according to whatever respective party’s vested interests. Take the obvious example: nuclear products. One one hand, you have treatments for cancer and an energy source with staggering potential. On the other hand, you have nuclear weapons or irreparable ecological damage due to reactor failures (whether due to human error, natural disasters, or whatever). Someone can refine nuclear products for powering thousands upon thousands of homes, or tweaking the recipe to make weapons-grade materials. All in the eye of the beholder, as it were. Or to a much lesser degree, say, the internet. You have a nearly infinite source of just about every scrap of knowledge ever logged by the human race, versus the dangers of hacking, internet addiction, stalking, etc. Pros and cons. Continue reading

Aphex Twin’s Syro: What Else to Say?

Aphex Twin, for the few that may not know of him, is Richard D. James, one of the most revered electronic artists of all time. He’s built up an impressive library of aliases spanning different eras of music and styles since the 80’s, and cultivated a sort of cult of secrecy about him like: disdaining any interviews and giving flippant, cryptic answers for the few he humoured. His last full album was Druqs in 2001, and his last real released work, the Analord series, frankly did little to inspire me, as expansive as it may have been (~60 tracks over 11 EPs). Now the silence has been broken by Syro, and for an actual interview with him, that’s quite good, I’d suggest reading this, it’ll explain some important things from a first-hand source.

Now, Syro. It’s sort of like a little of the “same,” but in the best way possible. The tracks feel like they have a classical sort of influence to them; they feel old but it’s all brought in a fresh way. There’s almost pervasive 80’s synth feel flowing underneath many of the tracks, like you could expect to hear them in a Blade Runner-esque film. I say that in the best way possible. When acid or jungle beats get piled on top of them, juxtoposed by the strange, processed vocals of James, his sons, or his wife, it makes for a captivating combination. Sometimes the beats, melody, and voices are given such a texture that is just… satisfying. You feel you know some of the samples, yet without feeling trite. I swear I hear the Amen Break sample in several of the tracks, and it’s glorious. Many of the tracks shift from style to style, and because plenty are in the 5-6 minute range (with one being over 10 minutes), they have room enough to breathe and change in an unhurried way. Continue reading

Continuing The Bipedal Question: On the Other Thumb

A quick follow-up to the last post, is another peculiar anatomical anomaly that came to my attention a few years back, and I’ve yet to find a suitable outlet for. So here it is.

Catgirls. Anime catgirls. Everyone has an image of this classic anime cliche (more properly called called neko or nekomimi which just means ‘cat’ or ‘cat ears,’ respectively), so ubiquitous to the anime image, that you can never see a single piece of Japanese animation and know about it.

But stop and think about it for a second. What’s odd about it? What does, or doesn’t work? Continue reading

The Bipedal Bias: Why So Many Playable Humanoids?

Humans are a predictable bunch. Two arms, two legs, head atop the shoulders, front-facing eyes, opposable thumbs. Basic stuff. Same goes with most vertebrates. Us with a backbone to speak of will never have more than four limbs, excepting species with tails, but even then, it’s only so much of a “limb.” When you pull back even further, most creatures have what’s called bilateral symmetry. That is, you could draw a line somewhere down/across the middle of the body and both halves would be effectively equal. Again, that’s most creatures, excepting things like sponges, sea stars, amongst a few others. It all comes down to growth, evolution, and a bunch of factors I can’t adequately explain or understand.

Keeping this in mind, let us look to our own traditions of fantasy and fiction that begin to break some of these scientific limits: Centaurs, Pegasus (flying horses in general, “pegasuses” doesn’t work), dragons, fairies, etc. Or looking to horror, Lovecraftian shoggoths and Elder Things. The Hutts from Star Wars. The list is expansive and continues far from here, but I shan’t go on and make a list nobody needs to read. Continue reading